The Earliest Water Features

The Earliest Water Features The water from creeks and other sources was originally delivered to the occupants of nearby towns and municipalities via water fountains, whose design was mainly practical, not aesthetic. To produce water flow through a fountain until the later part of the 1800’s, and generate a jet of water, mandated the force of gravity and a water source such as a spring or reservoir, situated higher than the fountain. The beauty and spectacle of fountains make them ideal for traditional monuments. Simple in design, the very first water fountains did not appear much like contemporary fountains. Simple stone basins crafted from nearby rock were the original fountains, used for religious ceremonies and drinking water. 2,000 B.C. is when the earliest known stone fountain basins were used. Early fountains put to use in ancient civilizations depended on gravity to control the circulation of water through the fountain. Positioned near reservoirs or creeks, the practical public water fountains provided the local citizens with fresh drinking water. Fountains with decorative Gods, mythological monsters, and animals began to appear in Rome in about 6 BC, built from rock and bronze. The extraordinary aqueducts of Rome supplied water to the incredible public fountains, most of which you can travel to today.

At What Point Did Water Fountains Emerge?

Point Water Fountains Emerge? 4312144023359662.jpg At What Point Did Water Fountains Emerge? Hundreds of classic Greek records were translated into Latin under the auspices of the scholarly Pope Nicholas V, who ruled the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455. Beautifying Rome and making it the worthy capital of the Christian world was at the core of his ambitions. In 1453 the Pope commissioned the reconstruction of the Aqua Vergine, an historic Roman aqueduct which had carried clean drinking water into the city from eight miles away. The ancient Roman tradition of building an awe-inspiring commemorative fountain at the point where an aqueduct arrived, also known as a mostra, was restored by Nicholas V. At the behest of the Pope, architect Leon Battista Alberti undertook the construction of a wall fountain in the spot where we now find the Trevi Fountain. Changes and extensions, included in the repaired aqueduct, eventually provided the Trevi Fountain and the well-known baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and Piazza Navona with the necessary water supply.
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