A Short History of the Early Outdoor Water Fountains

A Short History of the Early Outdoor Water Fountains Water fountains were initially practical in function, used to bring water from rivers or springs to towns and villages, supplying the residents with clean water to drink, bathe, and cook with. The force of gravity was the power source of water fountains up until the end of the nineteenth century, using the forceful power of water traveling downhill from a spring or creek to squeeze the water through valves or other outlets.Short History Early Outdoor Water Fountains 517017907173.jpg Fountains all through history have been created as monuments, impressing hometown citizens and visitors alike. If you saw the first fountains, you would not recognize them as fountains. Uncomplicated stone basins sculpted from local material were the first fountains, used for religious ceremonies and drinking water. The earliest stone basins are thought to be from about 2000 B.C.. The jet of water appearing from small spouts was forced by gravity, the only power source creators had in those days. Drinking water was delivered by public fountains, long before fountains became ornate public monuments, as attractive as they are practical. Fountains with ornamental Gods, mythological monsters, and creatures began to show up in Rome in about 6 BC, made from rock and bronze. The City of Rome had an elaborate system of aqueducts that delivered the water for the many fountains that were placed throughout the urban center.

Rome’s Ingenious Water Delivery Solutions

Rome’s Ingenious Water Delivery Solutions Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct built in Rome, commenced providing the men and women living in the hills with water in 273 BC, though they had depended on natural springs up until then. When aqueducts or springs weren’t available, people dwelling at greater elevations turned to water taken from underground or rainwater, which was made available by wells and cisterns. In the very early sixteenth century, the city began to use the water that flowed below ground through Acqua Vergine to furnish drinking water to Pincian Hill. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals. The manholes made it more straightforward to thoroughly clean the channel, but it was also achievable to use buckets to remove water from the aqueduct, as we viewed with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he bought the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he died. The cistern he had constructed to collect rainwater wasn’t adequate to meet his water specifications. That is when he decided to create an access point to the aqueduct that ran below his property.
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